New home needed for a lurcher left in the lurch

The Scottish SPCA is this week highlighting two friendly and sociable animals which are in need of new homes.

Friday, 23rd June 2023, 3:29pm
New home needed for a lurcher left in the lurch

Bryce is a friendly lurcher currently being cared for by the charity’s Angus, Fife and Tayside Animal Rescue and Rehoming Centre.

Bryce has lots of energy and loves nothing more than heading out for his daily walks.

He gets a bit overexcited when first heading out, but after a little while he will calm down and enjoy his exercise time.

He would be best suited to an active family who can take him out on lots of adventures.

Bryce is a great dog who is friendly to everyone he meets – humans and canines alike!

The Society thinks he could be rehomed with a dog friend pending successful introductions at the centre.

Bryce would not be suitable for a home with any resident cats or small animals.

If you can give Bryce his new home, please apply via the Scottish SPCA website: https://www.scottishspca.org/rehome-a-pet/10710-bryce

Mary the budgie is looking to fly into her permanent home. She is currently being cared for by the Scottish SPCA Edinburgh and Lothians Animal Rescue and Rehoming Centre.

Mary is a sassy bird who likes to let her presence be known! She likes to chirp all day and is very curious about her surroundings.

Mary could live in an aviary with other birds as she is very social and may enjoy the company.

Her new home would have to provide the correct set up for her with plenty of fun and enrichment activities to keep her mentally stimulated.

If you can give Mary her new home, please apply

via the Scottish SPCA website: https://www.scottishspca.org/rehome-a-pet/11098-mary

Meanwhile, the charity is continuing its warning to dog owners to avoid leaving dogs in vehicles on hot days and about the dangers that hot walks pose to dogs. Many people still inadvertently put their dogs at serious risk by taking them out during hot spells. Exercising your dog in hot weather could cause them just as much harm as leaving them in a hot car. If dogs are unable to reduce their body temperature by panting, they will develop heatstroke.

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